Open diff is no real

I keep testing and I can say that the open diff do not work correctly. They are running as limited-slip diff because they always pass power to the 2 wheels on the same axle (at different speeds). They never pass 100% of the power to a single wheel as a real open diff would. When a wheel stays in the air with an open diff, it would have to receive 100% of the power.

Youtube Video

last edited by jorge

Of course it's not real, it's a simulation. The same can be said for how locking the diffs isn't just like IRL... Does it work well enough for fun and game balance? Yes, yes it does.

@jorge I noticed this long ago and you are correct that all vehicles in MR have limited-slip differentials. I'm sure it makes the game more playable. Having said that, I wouldn't mind at least trying some vehicles with open differentials for more realism & challenge, but I doubt the devs will be making this change.

Community Moderator - Spintires

My opinion is, that game hits its limits in this case. Limited-slip diff is (probably) necessary, because of some imperfections somewhere else.
For example if there is steeper sloping on a pavement road, I still have to use difflock, otherwise there is one wheel spinning like a crazy and truck is moving just tiny bit (and even that is just because of limited slip diff). Traction imperfection...

@sodoma Exactly! Traction on pavement is ridiculously low. 2 days ago I was driving the Ford LT9000 with 6 long logs, on pavement. For some reason I stopped in a climb, on pavement. And the wheels span like hell when I restarted ! Huge load, 8 rear wheels with diff lock, and you still get some wheels spinning... I would understand an engine stall, but wheel spinning? Come on...
This low traction on pavement is also likely the reason why trucks are so hard to drive at "high speed", in my opinion...

On mud, I feel traction is too high 😆

last edited by minikeum

Yeah i have to admit that in previous maps i wasn't as bothered by the weird on-road traction and control problems because the roads weren't a huge feature... but the american maps and trucks are designed around the roads.

The freightliner seems to be the least effected by this, i dunno about stats but i always like driving that guy. The western star on the other hand is a nightmare at speed on road.

@jorge haha)
The crush part of this vid is very popular in youtube. But thx to you i saw the full video, great circus!
These clowns next time should attract more childrens to the leaking tank, and take weaker chain to let it tear apart itself and a couple of clown bodies, standing close to it ..

last edited by Stazco
Community Moderator - Spintires

Good old winch, there are days, when it saves you a lot of money and effort... 😎

@jorge said in Open diff is no real:

I keep testing and I can say that the open diff do not work correctly. They are running as limited-slip diff because they always pass power to the 2 wheels on the same axle (at different speeds). They never pass 100% of the power to a single wheel as a real open diff would. When a wheel stays in the air with an open diff, it would have to receive 100% of the power.

Youtube Video

is that how really works? afaik there are different kinds of differentials, and having one wheel in the air spining is the most common thing.

tbh im not really bothered by this... im bothered that if you dont use AWD in a truck that can use AWD, it will use only half the power. try it in the test map slope with a loaded truck... without AWD it cannot climb it, but with AWD it can, when the front wheels dont have almost any friction due to all the load being in the back.

@araxp said in Open diff is no real:

tbh im not really bothered by this... im bothered that if you dont use AWD in a truck that can use AWD, it will use only half the power. try it in the test map slope with a loaded truck... without AWD it cannot climb it, but with AWD it can, when the front wheels dont have almost any friction due to all the load being in the back.

I don't think that's the case, at least I never noticed it and I pay attention to details like that. Are you sure it's not because the rear didn't have enough traction to get up the hill? What vehicle did you use to test this?

i dont remember but it was in mudrunner many months ago. I used a long logs vehicle in the test map slope. As I said the front shouldnt have almost any traction at all since all the load was in the back and also in a slope, but switching to AWD made it climb it.

What I was testing is if I could give ALL the power to the rear wheels without AWD, which is what it would make sense. Instead it seems that it works, for example, splitting the power 33% for each axle, back having 66% (or whatever percentage), and you just turn on and off the front 33% boost. But it should really all the power go to the back if the front is turned off.

The front wheels having so little traction but making an impact, meant that the engine gave more power when I activated the AWD than it was giving before, cause if all the power went to the back with AWD OFF it would have been much more effective than giving it to the front.

I think Im making a mess of an explanation... But what I want to say is that if, for example, the truck has 400hp, if only the back wheels are active, those FULL 400hp should go to the back wheels, which seems that it doesnt in this game.

last edited by Araxp

@araxp said in Open diff is no real:

I think Im making a mess of an explanation... But what I want to say is that if, for example, the truck has 400hp, if only the back wheels are active, those FULL 400hp should go to the back wheels, which seems that it doesnt in this game.

I agree but I do think the game does this correctly. I just tested this yesterday again with the D-538 on Proving Ground. Turning on AWD certainly doesn't seem like it doubles the torque. It just redistributes the torque to all wheels, making hill climbing easier.

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