For the Uninitiated...
  • Greetings all!
    To my shame, I never got a chance to play the tabletop of Necromunda, though I've long heard about it (and Gorka morka, for that matter).

    What bits of lore stick out to you that you'd share with a NecroNoob like myself? What parts of the game stick out to you (lore-wise) about the tabletop game?

  • I was a massive fan of the Spyrers in the TTP version. A much smaller gang (children of the spire, sent into the underhive to cut their teeth amongst the denizens to show that they could survive the rigours of Spire-life and its own cut-throat nature), almost always outnumbered, but once they got their combat suits going and gaining a few skills and boosts, they became unbelievably fearsome.

    Having an Orrus walking down the opposing gangs heavy, shrugging off heavy weapons, small arms and anything else you could throw at it, resulting in the Orrus beating its target to a bloody pulp with his fists... unbelievably satisfying.

    If you can get your hands on it, the old rulebook was put up online for free from the Specialist Games section of GW for download, so the rulebook had plenty of little bits of fluff written in to it that gave a great sense of the dangers of the Underhive and those that populated it, human or otherwise.

    Also, Mark Gibbons created some of my favourite art pieces for Necro, including that of the Malcadon:

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    last edited by NaloaC
  • What always struck me was the "wild west" feeling of the setting, which seems odd at first glance given that we're dealing with laser weapons, radioactive mutants and kilometre-tall spire-cities.

    But you also have lawless frontiers, warring gangs, lawless outposts, native raids and outcasts, cutthroat business and gang-leaders robbing and murdering while trying to keep a thin veneer of, if not respectability then at least lawfulness.

    For a more concrete thing, one story that sticks with me is one of a spider hunter going after "the one who got away" (with lots of pretty obvious Moby Dick connotations).

  • One of the best things for me is I have the old Black and yellow hardback rule book with Outlanders, rulebook and campaign book all in one. It has all kinds of stories and background to really make the setting stand out.

    One story that always stood out for me was one of the special characters Mad Donna (http://wh40k.lexicanum.com/wiki/D'onne_Ulanti)

    "Calmly and extremely lady-like, D’onne stretched across the table and gouged out the Count's eye with a silver fish fork. Guards charged inside the dining room to find her removing the screaming Count's second eye, but could not understand what was happening or who if anybody they were supposed to shoot. While they remained uncertain Lady Ulanti took the prostrate Count's pistol and shot them both."

    This is just an exert from her back story but the book is full of them. Image of D'onne Ulanti

    last edited by Movian
  • I always loved Kal Jerico! Some of the old Black Library novels with him are excellent. They should republish around
    the same time or sooner and it might greatly increase interest in this game!

  • Kal Jerico was definitely an entertaining character, but I think my other favorite old novels were Junktion and Fleshworks.

    Junktion was cool because while it involved most of the major gangs and the Scaavies, they were supporting characters and the main character was just an Underhiver charged with maintaining the lights. On the one hand despite being short, like all the Necromunda novels sadly, it had a pretty involved plot, but more importantly it did a slice of life of an Underhive settlement and the difficulties of getting simple necessities in such a hostile place.

    Fleshworks was also a good one as it was a mix between a spy story and Repo Men(the artificial organ repossession movie). It was about a Deleque ganger and his struggles both with other gangs and rivals in his own. I think it did a good job highlighting the morally grey nature of the setting as it wasn't a matter of him and his gang being the good guys facing the evil other guys, there was bad guys all around and the protagonist was really morally neutral.

    There's a lot going for the setting and it's great to see it making a comeback. Hope they both republish and create new lore. They need to dump the almost curse words thou, have them or don't, substitutes just bring the story down.

    last edited by DeTortor
  • The Redeemer, need I say more? A tale of Redemption and revenge in the Underhive, with chainswords, flamers and excessive amount of flames. (It seems I did need to say more)

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